Phase Two Formation

Phase 2

The person who feels called to Carmel embarks on a journey of faith, like our models, Mary and Elijah. Gradually over the course of a lifetime, the Carmelite is changed, not just on an exterior plane but is transformed on every level of his personality if he consents to the will of God. In this way the Carmelite is conformed to Christ and becomes a new creation in him.

Carmelite Formation: A Journey of Transformation

New Phase 2 Materials

The Phase 2 materials have been revised and updated and are now available. Our community is using the following new materials in our current Phase 2 Formation class, which began in May 2015.

Climbing the Mountain

Climbing The Mountain: The Carmelite Journey, Second Edition, edited by Johan Bergström-Allen, T.O.C.

This lavishly illustrated book introduces in an accessible way the spirituality and heritage of the Carmelites to those approaching the tradition for the first time, as well as being a useful formation resource for those already familiar with Carmel’s riches. At the end of each chapter are suggested references and pages for notes. It is an ideal book for both study and reflection.
PUBLISHER: Edizione Carmelitane

L.C. Formation, Phase 2 Candidate Packet, 2015.

This packet contains the Carmelite Provincial History of the Most Pure Heart of Mary (PCM) and the Carmelite History of the Saint Elias Province (SF). These two documents are used in Lessons 8a and 8b.
PUBLISHER: North American Interprovincial Lay Carmelite Commission

In addition, members in Phase 2 are encouraged to supplement this material by reading books found on the Carmelite Bibliography and the list of Phase 2 Reference Materials.

Phase 2 Formation Lessons & Required Reading

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Explain why formation is a lifelong journey.
  2. Identify important companions on this journey.
  3. Consider how and why formation transforms his/her life.
  4. Discern how the Order’s contemplative charism of prayer, community, and service aids in personal transformation.

Required Reading:

  1. What is Formation?, Chapter 1, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 23-38)
  2. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Part III — Membership and Formation, Chapters 1-5 (Carmel’s Call, pp. 48-52).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  3. Provincial Statutes, Part II, Chapters 8 and 9 (Carmel’s Call, pp. 84-94)

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Discuss how all people are called to holiness.
  2. Learn how formation in the Carmelite way of life can help them respond to that call.
  3. Discover the meaning and importance of the term “vacare Deo.”
  4. Understand and discuss what the Carmelite tradition calls ‘the practice of the presence of God’ and how that can be incorporated into their lives.
  5. Learn the importance of silence and solitude on the journey to holiness.

Required Reading:

  1. The Call to Holiness, Chapter 2, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 41-58)
  2. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Part I, Chapter 1: The Vocation to Holiness (Carmel’s Call, pp. 25-26).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  3. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Provide the meaning of the term allegiance.
  2. Have a better understanding of both the divine and the human natures of Christ as presented in Scripture and the Carmelite Tradition.
  3. Discuss what it means to say that “Carmel is a Christocentric spirituality.”

Required Reading:

  1. In Allegiance to Jesus Christ, Chapter 3, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 59-78)
  2. The Rule of St. Albert, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 17-20)
  3. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Part III, Chapter 4: The Specific Call of the Lay Carmelite (Carmel’s Call, pp. 30-31, #17-18).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  4. Fundamental Values of Carmelite Spirituality, John Malley, O.Carm., (Phase 1 Candidate Manual, Appendix A, pp. 95-96)
    Download here.
  5. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Understand the term “Charism” and what this might mean for the Lay Carmelite.
  2. Identify some key themes (Language / Symbols / Images / Metaphors) within the Order’s Charism.
  3. Explain the prayer of the Carmelite.
  4. Identify which two biblical figures have been an inspiration to Carmelites from the very beginning of the Order’s existence.

Required Reading:

  1. Carmelite Spirituality and Charism, Chapter 4, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 79-94)
  2. Seasons of the Heart: The Spiritual Dynamic of the Carmelite Life (2001), John Welch, O.Carm.
    Download here.
  3. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Discover why Mary, the woman of faith, is considered to be the model of Christian Discipleship and a foundational figure in the life of a Carmelite.
  2. Define some of the uniquely Carmelite titles for Mary (Lady of the Place / Elijah’s Little Cloud / Mary the Contemplative)
  3. Discuss what it means to call Mary our sister on the journey of formation.
  4. Reflect on Mary, the woman of prayer, as a model for all Carmelites.

Required Reading:

  1. Mary, Chapter 5, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 95-112)
  2. The Rule of St. Albert, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 17-20)
  3. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Part 2, Chapter 9: Mary and Elijah – Presence, Inspiration and Guide (Carmel’s Call, pp. 36, #34).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  4. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Learn why Elijah is revered as “Father of all Carmelites.”
  2. Begin to discuss and learn some of the reasons we take Elijah as a model for our vocation as contemplatives and prophets.
  3. Discover the history and interpretations of the Carmelite shield.
  4. Identify the “false gods” we have in our own lives that may weaken our resolve to stand in the presence of the living God.

Required Reading:

  1. Elijah, Chapter 6, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 113-130)
  2. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Part 2, Chapter 9: Mary and Elijah – Presence, Inspiration and Guide (Carmel’s Call, pp. 36-37 #35) and Provincial Statutes, Part 3, Chapter 6: Mary and the Saints of Carmel (Carmel’s Call, p. 70 #6).
  3. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Begin to understand the historical background to the Rule of Saint Albert and its origin.
  2. Learn how the Rule, which is rooted in scripture, is “Key to Carmel.”
  3. Discuss what is meant by “allegiance to Jesus Christ.”
  4. Understand that prayer, private and communal, are at the heart of the Rule.
  5. Learn more about the origin of the Rule for the Third Order of Carmel.

Required Reading:

  1. The Rule of Saint Albert, Chapter 7, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 133-152)
  2. The Rule of St. Albert, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 17-20)
  3. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.
  4. Note: On page 141 of Climbing the Mountain in the section ‘Did you know?’, within the Third Order of North America, Director is the term used for the leader of the community.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Reflect on the meaning of history in general.
  2. Know the key points in Carmelite history from its beginnings to the Reform of Touraine.
  3. Reflect on the lessons our history has for the Carmelite Order.
  4. Beginto be able to apply these lessons to life as a Lay Carmelite today and in the future.

Required Reading:

  1. History of the Carmelite Family, Chapter 8, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 155-181)
  2. Supplement on the Provincial Histories of the Most Pure Heart of Mary (Appendix B) and St. Elias Provinces (Appendix C).

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Know the key points in Carmelite history from the Reform of Touraine to the present.
  2. Learn about and reflect on the lives of some of the Carmelite Martyrs of the 20th Century, including Titus Brandsma and Edith Stein.
  3. Discover some of the saintly members of Lay Carmel.
  4. Discuss some of the diverse ways in which Carmelites have responded to God’s invitation to holiness.

Required Reading:

  1. History of the Carmelite Family, Chapter 8, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 182-196)
  2. Supplement on the Provincial Histories of the Most Pure Heart of Mary (Appendix B) and St. Elias Provinces (Appendix C).

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Recognize that living in God’s presence is at the heart of all aspects of Carmelite spirituality.
  2. Explain how Elijah, Mary, Scripture, and our Carmelite traditions provide the tools for learning to live in God’s presence.
  3. Discuss how a Carmelite seeks to find God’s presence through his/her prayer life and particularly through contemplation.
  4. Define “Vacare Deo” and the process of finding space for God in your life and the challenges this presents.

Required Reading:

  1. Living in God’s Presence, Chapter 9, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 197-226)
  2. The Rule of St. Albert, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 17-20)
  3. Fundamental Values of Carmelite Spirituality, John Malley, O.Carm., (Phase 1 Candidate Manual, Appendix A, pp. 94-95)
    Download here.
  4. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Describe ways in which God might speak to us today and why.
  2. Explain what the Blessed Virgin Mary models for us about communicating with God.
  3. Understand how Lectio Divina might help us to hear God “speak.”
  4. Reflect on how God has spoken through us to others in our families, community, Church, and in society.

Required Reading:

  1. God Speaks, Chapter 10, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 227-252)
  2. Scripture Passages: Exodus 20:1-17; Deuteronomy 1:6-8; Matthew 5:1-12; Matthew 10:16-20
  3. The Catechism of the Catholic Church (§2697-2720 on Prayer).
    The entire Catechism is available online on the USCCB website. You can read Chapter 3: The Life of Prayer here.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Better understand the importance of Scripture in Jewish and Christian tradition.
  2. Discover the essentials of Lectio Divina, not so much as a method but an attitude.
  3. Discuss the models of Lectio Divina from the Old and New Testaments.
  4. Learn how Lectio Divina, both private and communal, is beneficial for all Carmelites.

Required Reading:

  1. Lectio Divina & Carmel’s Attentiveness to the Bible, Chapter 11, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 253-277)
  2. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel (Carmel’s Call, pp. 38 #39, 65 #4, 133-138).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  3. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Contrast the difference between our outward appearances and our internal attitudes and how we strive to bring the two into balance
  2. Discuss the significance of the Scapular as our Carmelite habit — both as a sacramental and as a symbol of the new attitudes we are developing.
  3. Learn the significance of putting on the Armor of God (as described in St. Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians) in the life of a Lay Carmelite.

Required Reading:

  1. Clothed with Carmel’s Attitude, Chapter 12, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 281-308)
  2. The Rule of St. Albert, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 17-20)
  3. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Part II, Chapter 8: The Contemplative Dimension of Life (Carmel’s Call, pp. 35 #32).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  4. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Explain why Carmel is centered on the Eucharist.
  2. List several Carmelite Saints or Blesseds who displayed a special affinity for the Eucharist.
  3. Understand what Mary and Elijah teach Carmelites about the Eucharist.
  4. Describe ways, other than the Mass, that a Lay Carmelite may experience Eucharistic moments.

Required Reading:

  1. Carmel and the Eucharist, Chapter 13, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 309-334)
  2. Patrick Thomas McMahon, O.Carm., ‘Nine Themes in Carmelite Spirituality,’ Carmel in the World, 2009, and available online on the Order of Carmelites website.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of community as part of the charism of Carmel.
  2. Reflect on Jesus’ disciples and the early Church as presented in the Acts of the Apostles as models for a Lay Carmelite community.
  3. Describe the ways to ensure that our communities are authentically Carmelite.
  4. Discuss the importance of recognizing the gifts of each individual member of the community and learning to value differences and diversity among the members.

Required Reading:

  1. Community, Chapter 14, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 335-370)
  2. International Congress of Lay Carmelites, Formation and Communication at the Service of the Community, Proceedings of the Congress at Sassone, September 2006, (Rome: Edizioni Carmelitane, 2007).
  3. Patrick Thomas McMahon, O.Carm., ‘Nine Themes in Carmelite Spirituality,’ Carmel in the World, 2009, and available online on the Order of Carmelites website.
  4. It would be helpful to read this chapter with a copy of a Bible on hand. The New Revised Standard Version is recommended but any translation will do.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Define the parts of the Carmelite Family (first, second, and third orders) and the wider Carmelite family.
  2. Develope a deeper understanding of what makes a person a saint; and explain the concepts of intercession, inspiration, and union with God.
  3. Reflect on the special place devotion to Mary, Elijah, and the family members of Jesus have in the Carmelite tradition.

Required Reading:

  1. The Carmelite Family and the Communion of Saints – Part 1, Chapter 15, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 371-382, 400-402)
  2. ‘Carmel in the World’, Joseph Chalmers, O.Carm., In Allegiance to Jesus Christ, (Rome: Edizioni Carmelitane, 1999), pp. 39-44.
    This article is available online through the The British Province of Carmelite Friars website.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Describe the stages of the Church’s formal process of declaring a person a saint — Servant of God, Venerable, beatification, and canonization.
  2. Reflect on the place of asceticism in the life of the saints and explain how each of us can develop our own ascetical nature.
  3. Understand the saints as they are recognized in the Liturgy of the Hours, and learn the different ways they are celebrated: solemnities, feasts, memorials, and optional memorials.

Required Reading:

  1. The Carmelite Family and the Communion of Saints – Part 2, Chapter 15, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 383-404)
  2. ‘General Roman Calendar’ and ‘Proper of Saints’ in Christian Prayer: The Liturgy of the Hours (Catholic Book Publishing Co., New York), Instructions at the front of each volume
  3. Carmelite Postulator’s Office Website: www.carmelites.info/postulator

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Explain how and why the Carmelite lives his/her baptismal promises fully.
  2. Understand how the Carmelite’s life of prayer leads to generous service.
  3. Reflect on his/her own personal call to service (home, workplace, community, and beyond).
  4. Understand why Lay Carmelites are to be “leaven in the world” and to serve “in the midst of the people.”
  5. Realize Carmel’s special service to the Church and to the poor and marginalized.

Required Reading:

  1. Carmel’s Call to Service, Chapter 16, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 405-436)
  2. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel, Chapter 12: Service, #46-49 (Carmel’s Call, pp. 40-42).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.
  3. The Provincial Statutes, Chapter 5, #1-6 (Carmel’s Call, pp. 67-68)
  4. Fundamental Values of Carmelite Spirituality, John Malley, O.Carm., (Phase 1 Candidate Manual, Appendix A, p. 101)
    Download here.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Comprehend Carmelite values for living in the world, and the commitment to seeking to make God’s Kingdom a reality here on earth.
  2. Describe practical ways to heed Carmel and the Church’s call to aid the poor, promote social justice, respect life, and foster ecumenism.

Required Reading:

  1. Carmel and the Kingdom: Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation, Chapter 17, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 437-476)
  2. Joseph Chalmers, O.Carm., ‘The Prophetic Element of the Carmelite Charism,’ in In Allegiance to Jesus Christ, (Rome: Edizioni Carmelitane, 1999), pp. 52-58
    This article is available online through the The British Province of Carmelite Friars website.
  3. Wilfred McGreal, O.Carm., Mendicant Friars — Justice and Peace, available online at www.carmelite.org as a PDF: Download here.
  4. John Welch, O.Carm., ‘Contemplation and Compassion: The Tradition as Resource for Justice and Peace,’ in The Carmelite Way: An Ancient Path for Today’s Pilgrim (Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 1996)

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Discover some of the earlier saints of the Carmelite Order.
  2. Discuss why the Order is both Elijan and Marian.
  3. Know why Saint Albert is called “lawgiver of Carmel.”
  4. Learn why Saint Paul the Apostle is considered a model for Carmelites.

Required Reading:

  1. Holy Men and Women of Carmel: Part 1 – Early Saints, Chapter 18, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 477-506)
  2. Carmel’s Call— Carmelite Calendar (pp. 247-253).
    Also available online.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Learn about some of the early reforms of the Order and the Saints involved in those reforms.
  2. Reflect on how they may look to the early saints of Carmel for inspiration for their vocation today.
  3. Reflect on what it is about Carmelite spirituality that has led many Carmelites to be Doctors of the Church.
  4. Discover more about Saint Teresa of Ávila, John of the Cross, and their important writings.

Required Reading:

  1. Holy Men and Women of Carmel: Part 2 – Early Saints, Chapter 18, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 507-525)
  2. Carmel’s Call— Carmelite Calendar (pp. 247-253).
    Also available online.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Discuss the Reform of Touraine and its long-lasting effect on the Carmelite Family.
  2. Learn about some of the Carmelite saints of Italy, France, and Spain.
  3. Discover some of the new branches on the vine of Carmel.
  4. Begin to learn about some of the great Carmelite Saints of modern times.

Required Reading:

  1. Holy Men and Women of Carmel: Part 1 – Later Saints, Chapter 19, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 529-548)
  2. Carmel’s Call— Carmelite Calendar (pp. 247-253).
    Also available online.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Learn about and reflect on the lives of some of the Carmelite Martyrs of the 20th Century, including Titus Brandsma and Edith Stein.
  2. Discover some of the saintly members of Lay Carmel.
  3. Discuss some of the diverse ways in which Carmelites have responded to God’s invitation to holiness.

Required Reading:

  1. Holy Men and Women of Carmel: Part 2 – Later Saints, Chapter 19, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 548-568)
  2. Carmel’s Call— Carmelite Calendar (pp. 247-253).
    Also available online.

Lesson Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson the Member should be able to:

  1. Consider what role Carmel and its spirituality will have in his/her future.
  2. Reflect on his/her personal journey in Carmel and determine whether the Carmelite story is “my story.”
  3. Understand that commitment to Carmel means a never-ending relationship with Jesus and commitment to His Gospel.
  4. Show the Formator and local community that a serious discernment process toward commitment to Carmel is in place.

Required Reading:

  1. Commitment to Carmel, Chapter 20, Climbing the Mountain (pp. 569-600)
  2. The Rule for the Third Order of Carmel — All sections as listed in the text (Carmel’s Call, pp. 23-58).
    Also available online at the Order of Carmelites website.